Top 50 (ish) Major College Football Rivalry Trophies: Part 1

More than 60 major college football trophies are out there, just itchin’ to be broken down on a criterion-by-criterion basis and judged. Break out the metaphorical Aveeno. They need itch no more.

Below is a countdown of the Top 48 rivalry trophy game trophies, ranked in a three-part system of these factors: originality, tradition and Sheer Awesomness. See here for more details, but bottom line is that number at the far right is the total score (L-R: scores are for originality, tradition and Sheer Awesomeness)

46.

Governor’s Cup Kentucky-Louisville 1994 1 2 4 7

By far looks the most awesome of the three rivalry series governor’s cups nationwide. But such an unoriginal premise….

(Year in italics marks first year awarded was given)

45.

Victory Cannon Central Michigan-Western Michigan 2011 2 3 2 7

Already was a trophy w/ “victory” in its name out there. And others involving a cannon.

(PS – The scoring above works like this: originality 2 

 + tradition 3

+ Sheer Awesomeness 2 = Total Score of 7 [of maximum of 15] )

44.

Legends Trophy Notre Dame-Stanford 1989 3 2 3 8

Leave the beautiful, symbolic hybrids of Irish crystal and California redwood to the art museums.

43.

Platypus Trophy Oregon-Oregon State 1959 5 2 1 8

Not a game trophy; goes to alumni associations instead.

42.

Apple Cup Washington-Washington State 1962 2 3 3 8

Conceptually, this is just such low-hanging fruit, state of Washington.

And he doesn't mind AT ALL.

Not that he minds AT ALL.

41.

Jefferson-Eppes Florida State-Virginia 1996 2 4 2 8

Elegant, yes. Awesome? No.

40. and 39. (PS: Sorry, I’m an irrational maniac with these tandem groupings. I know.)

Governor’s Cup Georgia-Georgia Tech 1995 2 4 2 8
Governor’s Cup Kansas-Kansas State 1969 2 4 2 8

Sigh. Yet another Governor’s Cup. Someone needs to legislate a limit here.

38.

Bronze Stalk Ball State-Northern Illinois 2008 3 4 1 8

Sorry, but I’m not playing even an ounce harder for the propsect of winning a giant corn and neither should you.

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Worst 15 Trophy Rivalry Games In Major College Football

Behold: the jaw-slackening Non-Glory of the nation's worst major college trophy game.

Behold: the jaw-slackening Non-Glory of the nation’s worst major college trophy game.

Earlier this week, the Associated Press produced a “Best Traveling Rivalry Trophies” list that does scant justice to the ritual. Simply passing a hat between scribes and listing old-ish trophy games, one through ten, ain’t cool, AP. No description? No evaluation? Nary a mention of criteria!?

Smh.

Our nation’s great game deserves better. It deserves more. It deserves a Greg McElroy-in-SEC Network-film-room-bunker-style breakdown of each and every one of the current trophy rivalry games at the major college level along with the involved programs. Rest assured, such an arch-analysis – and master ranking – is coming soon to an SB Nation page near you.

One major aspect of the rivalry game ranking should be coolness of the trophy itself. Along these lines, I have devised a 15-point scoring system to produce a score that is actually a composite of three sub-categories:  “Originality,” “Tradition” and “Sheer Awesomeness.” Each of these sub-categories is worth 0 (worst) to 5 (best) points.

“Originality” represents how unique the trophy and its name are, as well as how unique and relevant its origin story is for the students of the involved programs. Naming a trophy “Governor’s Cup” is not looked kindly on in this department. Tradition represents the extent to which the trophy has meaningful ties to the programs and/or native region, and the significance the trophy holds in the larger context of game-day rivalry rituals between the programs.

The last metric here is “Sheer Awesomeness,” which admittedly can sometimes be in an eye of the beholder type thing. But here it’s simply a blended answer to two very straight-forward questions:

1) You’re Scot warrior William Wallace, of 13th-century kicking-ass  fame. You’ve been parachuted across time into modern America and before you learn what a cell phone is you’re told to fight for Trophy X. Upon first seeing it, how hard does your brave heart start beating?

2) If a group of major college football players were to win a spot on Extreme Makeover: Apartment Edition, how much would they enjoying seeing Trophy X appear in the corner of their TV room, regardless of what college they play for?

Ok, that part was easy.

Now, on to the next step: Add the point totals from all three categories together and you get my final, cumulative trophy score. It’s dubbed “Sweetness of Trophy,” or S.O.T. for short. I’ve highlighted each S.O.T. score in red below.

As of a point of reference, after the names of the programs, the categories from left to right follow as such:


Year Trophy First Awarded;    Originality;    Tradition;    Sheer Awesomeness;   Sweetness of Trophy   


Let’s get on with the rankings. We’re starting at the bottom:

62.

Textile Bowl Clemson-North Carolina State 1981 1 1 0   2

Finding out this rivalry is considered by those who know it exists to be “friendly” is bad. Seeing the actual trophy – possibly the sport’s most anodyne – is worse.

61.

Shillelagh Purdue-Notre Dame 1957 1 2 1      4

Were there an American Gaelic war club trophy club, Notre Dame would be its charter member.

60.

Hardee’s Trophy Clemson-South Carolina 1999* 0 2 2 4

Some reports indicate the Hardee’s era is mercifully over. South Carolina’s sports department tells me it will be around for at least one more Palmetto Bowl.

59.

The Bell Ohio-Marshall 1997 1 2 1 4

How is this not a farcically blatant rip off of nearby Miami(Ohio)-Cincinnati’s Victory Bell?

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How Jarryd Hayne’s Sprint Time Compares to NFL Stars’

Will Hayne be the Neil Armstrong of Rugby/NFL dual superstardom?

Hayne could be the Neil Armstrong of Rugby/NFL dual superstardom

While the headlines Australian rugby superstar Jarryd Hayne generated last month by announcing a crossover to the NFL have simmered down, the training for his new life in the U.S. has heated up. How efficiently  the 26-year-old can train his body to handle the demands of American football in the coming months will to a large part determine his future success.

In whichever city he ultimately lands, that transition won’t easy.

Take it from the British rugby player Hayden Smith, who attempted a similar transition.  “American Football is about short bursts of speed and power. The guys are bigger but then they don’t have to have the endurance that rugby players do,” he told The Telegraph in December, 2012 after a season in the NFL. “So, having come back, one of the things I need to work on is getting my conditioning back to where it  needs to be to play rugby again. You spend more time in the gym and then sprint training and body control. It is key to be able to change direction quickly without breaking stride.”

While both sports at their highest levels require unusually high combinations of speed, agility and strength, American football is driven much more by structured set pieces while rugby tends to be a more free-flowing game.  There, positions – and body shapes – have become more specialized. In rugby, meanwhile, body sizes across all positions tend to be more uniform.

It’s been rumored up to six NFL teams have been interested in trying Hayne out, including the Detroit Lions. Detroit running back Reggie Bush firsthand saw Hayne’s rugby ability this summer on a visit to Australia and said he felt Hayne’s extraordinary vision, quickness and powerful frame would help him excel in the NFL were he to choose that path.

After Hayne announced he was indeed going down that path on October 15,  he said he has no doubt about the difficulties the change entails.  “We’ll take it week by week and see where I’m at and whether I’m in that condition to progress for a trial or not,” he told The Guardian. “If we go down that avenue, then so be it. But the overall plan is for 12 months and to do as much training as I can and to prepare and to learn all the routes, learn all the schemes … I just want to get the basics down pat.”

Hayne said he needed to shed 10 kilograms, improve core strength through a rigorous gym program and markedly raise his sprint speed. The challenge is huge, as at the 2014 NFL Draft Combine 20 wide receivers were clocked at less than 4.5 seconds in the 40-yard dash. In the strength department, 12 participants lifted 102kg (bench press) more than 16 times in a row, with 23 reps the highest.

So how do Hayne’s metrics stack up?

First off, rugby prospects’ speed aren’t measured using the NFL’s standard 40-yard dash. They instead run 100 meter dashes. Hayne has claimed a time of 11.20 seconds, making him Australia’s third-fastest rugby player, according to The Telegraph.

That time does not, however, convert to elite NFL speed. The following graph shows 100 meter times of a few NFL running backs and kick returners who have been measured at that length  (These are the positions for which Hayne is seen as a most likely fit).

Notable 100m Dash Times of NFL Players

Player     Position     100m Dash Time

Jamaal Charles RB     10.18

Trindon Holliday KR     9.98

Devin Hester KR/WR     10.42

Reggie Bush RB     10.42 (High School)

Pre-season workouts: How NFL stars prepare for action

As if simply looking at NFL stars’ bodies wasn’t enough, the above times are clear indicators NFL players are world-class athletes. To maximize their performance, though, they must follow pre-season drills and exercises specifically tailored to their individual body shape, physiology and fitness goals.

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Six-Minute Video of Nearly 10,000 Hog Fans Flooding Field after Beating LSU

For at the least the third time in school history, students swarmed the field at what’s now the Reynolds Razorback Stadium. In 1999, I was in the stands as a freshman UA student. Seeing so many classmates rush the field to tear down the goalposts (en route to Dickson St.) in the aftermath of a 28-24 win over Tennessee was an amazing thing. But it’s only in my mind. No iPhones back then.

That wasn’t the case Saturday night, in the aftermath of the most cathartic sports event I’ve ever experienced. I happened to be in the stands once more, this time with means to document the historic night.

Here are a few snapshots  -

Below are a couple videos, too. The one at top shows hundreds of UA students gushing all of the sudden onto the field. If I were to make a horrible analogy, I’d say it’s similar to seeing someone’s water break. But I won’t do that.

(PS – Excuse the initial shakiness. It took a while to get my bearings with all the pandemonium.)

Aftermath

IMG_0134


Before Arkansas-LSU, Had a Winless Conference Team Been Favored Vs. a Top 25 Squad?

brolyles snazzy passerOn the surface, it doesn’t make any sense.

How can a team not able to muster a conference win in 25 months be favored heading into a game against a perennial SEC power and Top 25 team? Yet it’s this unlikely situation Arkansas found itself in much of this week entering tonight’s home game vs. No. 20 LSU. Many major sportsbooks in Las Vegas favored the Hogs by one. They knew Arkansas has been so close to beating a a few Top 10 teams this season as it plows through the nation’s toughest schedule.

But has anything like this ever happened before? That is, has a team still winless in conference in November entered a game against a Top 25 team as nearly the favorite, in the process spitting on one of Bill Parcells’ most treasured maxims?

Not quite – but close.

In the last 12 years or so, the most similar parallel came on Nov 24th, 2012 from the Big East, when Pittsburgh (4-6, 1-4) was favored by 1.5 over No. 18 Rutgers (9-1, 5-0),  according to research done by the full-service sports statistical site KOStats.com. Pitt beat Rutgers 27-6. But for insight into the 20th century, I went to my football historian friend Andrew McKillop of FootballGeography.com. He came back with this:

“There were some leads, but when I looked up the line the Top 25 team was always favored.
The closest I found was in 1944. Duke (1-4) was called just a slight underdog at home against No. 5 Georgia Tech. Duke won and the next week they were ranked No. 20th by the AP – despite that 2-4 record.”
Guess why this Georgia Tech squad was ranked so highly to begin with?
Frank Broyles – the 1944 SEC Player of the Year.
broyles punt

 Images courtesy of Georgia Tech Archives and Special Collections

Yes, Broyles, the eventual legendary Razorback patriarch who hired Jeff Long who hired Bret Bielema who leads Arkansas tonight. Broyles, still kicking at age 89, was in his playing days a jack-of-all-trades All-American back who punted, threw for touchdowns and returned opponents’ passes for scores of his own.

Heading into that November 4, 1944 game at Duke, Broyles had helped lead Georgia Tech to a 5-0 record including a 17-15 takedown of then-dominant Navy. The Blue Devils, which were in a different conference, had only lost by seven to Navy but had been crushed 7-27 by Army the game before.

It didn’t matter. This game belonged to Duke, despite Broyles’ throwing for a 42-yard touchdown to Mickey Logan.

Mickey Logan: Georgia Tech's Rudy?

Mickey Logan: Georgia Tech’s Rudy?

Duke went on to win its remaining four games, including wipe outs of North Carolina, Wake Forest and South Carolina, as well as a Sugar Bowl victory over Alabama. Georgia Tech won its next three of four games (inc. LSU) and was invited to the Orange Bowl, where Broyles threw for 304 yards in a loss to Tulsa (a record not broken until Tom Brady did it in 2000).

FB: Straight dual-threatin'

            Broyles: Straight dual-threatin’

In later years, Broyles would get his revenge on Duke. Not in football as Arkansas’ head coach, but in basketball as its athletic director. Thirty years after that 1944 loss, he convinced a promising young basketball coach named Eddie Sutton to leave Creighton and come to Fayetteville. Duke was another program heavily courting Sutton at the time, according to Sports Illustrated.

Fifty years after that loss, he would watch in Charlotte as his basketball program and another coach he hired wrest something even more precious from Duke – a national title.

In case you doubted the above 1945 Georgia Tech annual clips are authentic, kindly observe Allen Bowen’s nickname below for verification:

Broyles profile pic throwing

all americans


Matt Jones’ & David Bazzel’s Ideas for an Arkansas-Missouri Rivalry Trophy

The Yellow Horde Cometh. Rejoice?

The Golden Horde Cometh.

Can Missouri become the legit Arkansas rival into which LSU never quite developed?

Many Hog fans believe so. From a geographic standpoint, it makes sense, considering the campuses are about five hours apart – an hour closer than Ole Miss (Oxford) ,  the second-closest SEC campus to Fayetteville.

“I believe in the next decade or so it will be a good rivalry,” former Arkansas quarterback Matt Jones says. “Both Arkansas and Mizzou are kind of in the same boat” in terms of overall recent football success. For the hate to really to flourish, though, Missouri must remain near the top of the SEC East and Arkansas must start beating its SEC West foes. He believes that for a true rivalry to flourish between two SEC programs, they must both meet in a regular season finale, both should win roughly half the games they play with each other overall, and each program should – at least once every five years –  play in the game with an SEC Championship Game appearance on the line.

It’s possible if both teams head into that final game with zero or one loss, they would meet again a few weeks later in the SEC Championship Game.  That’s something LSU and Arkansas can’t do now. And it’s not inconceivable that if both programs keep building off their current momentum, they may in a few years end up as two of the four (or eight) College Football Playoff teams. Any post-season clash at this level would kick the rivalry authentication process into warp speed.

Mutual success in the early years will ensure a healthy rivalry in the long run even when both programs inevitably wane at some point. Matt Jones likened this dynamic to Ole Miss and Mississippi State, where “if they beat each other and nobody else, that’s all that matters. It was never like that with LSU and us.”

Two other important factors here: A) As an SEC newcomer, Missouri hasn’t yet had time to develop a more hated in-conference rival already as Texas and LSU had and B) The rivalry’s basketball side will complement and strengthen the football animosity in ways that never happened with LSU-Arkansas or even Texas-Arkansas.

The fact left Hog basketball coach Mike Anderson and much of his staff left Missouri for Arkansas plays a lot into this, of course. It also helps the states of Missouri and Arkansas are in golden eras in terms of elite basketball recruits per capita, their schools often recruit against each other for the best players and that in vast swaths of northern Arkansas and Missouri, basketball – not football – is the most popular sport. That’s not the case in Louisiana and Texas.

Time will tell exactly what form the Missouri-Arkansas rivalry takes, and how deeply it will impress itself on the memories and hearts of today’s young Arkansans and Missourians.

In the short term, however, we have a much more concrete image of what the rivalry will look like. Earlier this month, the two colleges announced the game’s logo:

Battle line rivalry

In a press release, the University of Arkansas played up the “geographic and historical boundaries” between the states, “from disputed demarcations of the border separating the two states to notable alumni and former personnel with ties to both storied athletic programs. The historic rivalry between the two states will take on even more meaning now, as every Thanksgiving weekend the Battle Line will be drawn on the gridiron. The Razorbacks or Tigers will ultimately stake claim to the “Line” – until the next meeting.”

We don’t yet know what the “Line” is, exactly, but don’t be surprised to see a trophy emerge here. Will it, like the Golden Boot, be clad in the glory of a thousand suns?

Probably not.

But there are some interesting ideas out there. I find it hard not to like the message board favorite “ARMOgedden,” but for now the graphic representation of it wallows in alumni association tailgating motif purgatory.

Former Arkansas quarterback Matt Jones would like to see a kid-friendly trophy emphasizing the mascots. It would represent a giant pot, containing a “Tiger Sooey” witches’ brew that would be stirred by some not-yet-defined creature’s hand, he says.  Perhaps sticking out from the pot would be a tiger paw, or hog’s leg. Perhaps a witch looking like a hog-tiger hybrid stirs it. Suffice to say, Jones’ idea hasn’t exactly congealed.

David Bazzel has also had a crack at it.  His idea is one Carmen Sandiego would love. The logo he designed features the line of latitude which serves as much of Arkansas’ northern border. Nationally, the parallel 36°30′ north is best known for marking the Missouri Compromise, which in the early 1800s divided prospective free and slave states west of the Mississippi River:

mizzouark

For a few years controversy extending all the way to Washington D.C. entangled the Missouri-Arkansas area near the Mississippi River. The result: Arkansas’ weird, jagged northeastern corner. “I think anything’s cool if you have a historical context to it,” Bazzel says. If his idea had taken, “people would have said ‘What is 36°30’?’, and that’s where you would have to explain it to them. So it would have included history.”

Bazzel says he offered his concept to some people at IMG College, a major collegiate sports marketing company, involved creating the rivalry logo. He isn’t sure to what extent, if any, his idea was assimilated into the final rendition.  “I don’t mind the ‘battle line,’” he says. “It’s similar to what I was doing.”

When it comes to branding the future of Arkansas and Missouri’s rivalry, the past is in.


Why LSU & Arkansas Players Mock the Notion of a True Rivalry Between Them

http://www.hogdb.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/1910-Arkansas-LSU-Program-Edited.jpg

Despite the presence of seed, LSU-Arkansas could never really take root. via HogDB.com

Twenty two years after leaving the Southwest Conference for the SEC, Arkansas still doesn’t have a true conference rival. On paper, it should have been LSU, a perennial conference title contender (like Texas) bordering Arkansas (like Texas) that like Texas once prevented Arkansas from winning a national championship.

  Plus, the annual LSU-Arkansas series has had perks Texas-Arkansas never did: a regular spot on national TV during Thanksgiving weekend, the Bellagio of college football trophies in the 200-pound Golden Boot and no in-state rival like Texas A&M to stir Texas fans’ deepest passions (well, no Aggies for a while, anyway).

 On top of all that, LSU-Arkansas has recently produced games every bit as competitive and entertaining to watch as the great Hog-Longhorn showdowns of the 1960s. And it’s likely this Saturday’s game in Fayetteville, for which Arkansas is a 1 point favorite according to SportsBettingAcumen.com sites, produces yet another thriller.

  “It’s a rivalry game,” Arkansas coach Bret Bielema told me in an interview for SB Nation. “The boot represents more than just a victory. It’s a battle between two states, something our fans take a lot of pride in. Obviously with LSU being the last game of the year there’s been a built-up rivalry here that we will hope to continue.”

   Bielema lauds the rivalry aspect of the game in public, just as previous Arkansas and LSU coaches and players have. It’s no secret, though, that the enmity true rivals have for each other has been lacking here.

   Take it from Matt Jones, the former Razorback quarterback responsible for the “Miracle on Markham,” possibly the series’ most memorable moment – a 31-yard Hail Mary pass to DeCori Birmingham with nine seconds left in the 2002 game that sent Arkansas to the SEC Championship game. The year before, Jones was on the opposite side as Arkansas lost a 41-38 contest sending the Tigers to Atlanta. “You knew it was a big game for whatever reason but there never ever seemed like there was a connection between Arkansas and LSU,” he says. “It was almost like it was a little bit forced on you.”

Jones says many of his teammates felt the same, as did LSU foes like running back LaBrandon Toefield. After college, Jones and Toefield were NFL teammates in Jacksonville, Fla. “We always joked” about how the series was played up, Jones says. Many LSU players “didn’t see it as a rivalry at all,” he recalls Toefield saying. “It was something the media put out.”

    Carter Bryant, an Arkansas native and LSU grad, is part of the media. Now a radio host in El Dorado, Ark., he’s covered Tiger football for four years and doesn’t understand why the rivalry hasn’t caught on more. “It means a good deal to people in south Arkansas and north Louisiana because of proximity,” he says.

    “But to the people of south Louisiana, it means little compared to other rivalries with trophies. LSU has pushed the Ole Miss rivalry over the years with the Magnolia Bowl trophy. Alabama with [Nick] Saban history has created a fascinating narrative plus instant classics. Every other team in the SEC West outside of Mississippi State is probably viewed as more heavily anticipated and vitriolic matchup in the minds of LSU fans.” That includes Texas A&M, which has supplanted Arkansas as the Tigers’ season finale. Not coincidentally, annual primetime showdowns with Texas A&M will help generate more profit for the SEC most years than an Arkansas matchup would.

  For now, Arkansas fans are as likely to hate Alabama, or Ole Miss, as LSU. Or even an SEC East program.  “The team that I hated the most was Tennessee,” Jones recalls. Jones, who grew up in Van Buren, points to one experience as the reason. He recalls as a nine-year-old hunting with his father and walking onto a cabin in the woods. Inside, people were watched TV and cheered. On the screen, the unranked Razorbacks were pushing the No. 4 Volunteers to the wire on the road. He’ll never forget the euphoria that followed watching Arkansas kicker Todd Wright’s 41-yard field goal sail through the uprights with two seconds left to give Arkansas its first victory in Knoxville, Tenn.

   Tennessee, though, already had Alabama and Florida as nemeses. Another SEC border state, Mississippi, had two in-state rivals. “Everybody kind of had a rival but us, so we had to manufacture one,” former Arkansas coach Houston Nutt says.

    Enter David Bazzel, an entrepreneur who has found a niche promoting Arkansas college athletics. Bazzel loves gold, and he loves football, and from all that love sprung the idea for this:

lsu-arkansas-the-boot-2012-570x379

Bazzel’s Golden Boot trophy, which depicts the two states’ outlines, debuted in 1996. He hoped its record-setting 4-foot plus height would help the game attract national attention and produce better competition. “It’s about playing for something, whether it be a paper clip, a rubber band or empty Coke can,” he says. In this case, “it just so happens to be a 200-pound trophy.”  He adds: “I wanted it to develop into a fun trophy game, not particularly a rivalry.”

Historically, most trophy games, of course, are based in rivalries. But that’s changing as power conferences create trophies for series involving program with little shared history. Usually these series involve states that don’t share borders,  like Nebraska-Wisconsin or South Carolina-Texas A&M, but the situation with Arkansas’ next SEC-sanctioned rival is different.

That would be Missouri, which replaces LSU as Arkansas’ regular season finale.


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